Thirteen Ways Goverment Budget Cuts Have Failed my Family (A Shortened Version)

It’s been in the news lately that my local  county council are facing massive budget cuts and are failing SEN children. Was I shocked? Course not. Here’s a little list of some of the ways that budget cuts and “belt tightening” have personally affected my family so far in the last five years. 

1) When I was in labour with Tilly, the unit was understaffed and so the midwife failed to spot that I was haemorrhaging heavily until my mum pointed out I was turning grey. I almost died in that labour room. 
2) When Tilly was a few months old, my GP at the time told me she was “failing to thrive” but couldn’t refer me to anyone bar the growth paediatrician as the referrals would be rejected. 
3) when Tilly was 10 months old my wonderful Health Visitor did her one year check early and sent off referrals to physio, development and speech therapy. All were rejected. Not enough funds.
4) When Tilly was 18 months old, those referrals that were resent countless times by my wonderful Health visitor were finally accepted. She couldn’t walk, feed herself or make many sounds by this point. 
5) Those referrals didn’t turn out to be very helpful, the physio wasn’t enough, the speech therapy was pretty much nothing, only portage and her new developmental paediatrician seemed to be able to help. My parents fortunately paid for private physio and occupational therapy to finally get her on her feet.

6) When Tilly was struck down by a virus aged 2, she could no longer sit, crawl or walk. Budget cuts meant that rehabilitation physio was a piece of paper. 
7) When she was hospitalised for a week suffering endless seizures, again she couldn’t walk. This time a charity stepped in and got her walking again. 
8) It took eighteen long months to get Tilly the wheelchair she needed and when it came, it wasn’t really suitable. There was no raincover, it was impossible to push and very very heavy. Budget cuts meant I had to like it or lump it. 
9) The local children’s centres were closed. We no longer had a safe haven to go. Isolation crept in. 
10) Tilly was discharged from occupational health that she desperately needed because her therapist went on maternity and budget cuts meant she wasn’t replaced. Again, we had to go private. You don’t want to know how expensive that is. 
11) The disability team at social services have turned us down multiple times for support and respite “any single mother would struggle with two young children” loosely translates to “we don’t have any money so until you put them at risk, soz”
12) Last year my child tax credits were stopped for months with no warning thanks to a spiteful company called Concentrix going after every single parent they could find. It was a very difficult few months and I am lucky enough to have my parents to help me feed the children. Others were being turned away from food banks and suicidal, feeling they had let their children down by being unable to feed them. 
13) Every appointment, every referral, every service, every phone call is painful. You know that you’ll be waiting 6 months for a ten minute appointment, they are so understaffed. You know you’ll be told no over and over and over again.
So. Austerity Britain, how much worse does this have to get before something gives?



Back Off Our Hospital 

I wasn’t shocked at all today to read that the hospital, Queen Alexandra in Portsmouth, where my children were born and where Tilly has been cared for many times over the last five years was slammed by the Care Quality Commission in their latest report. 
I wasn’t shocked at all… No.  I was furious. After all, this is the hospital that saved my life when I almost died during childbirth. This is the hospital that safely brought Arlo into the world. The place where Tilly was blue lighted at 3am after an hour long seizure. Where we’ve stayed many many nights. Where we go for a billion appointments a year. 


I was furious because I remember the midwife who promised me I’d be okay as I was wheeled to theatre after haemorrhaging and the obstetrician who saved me that day. I remember the paramedics who made it bearable to sit in an ambulance whilst being blue lighted at 3am thirty minutes away (they closed my local hospital) willing my child to stay conscious, the nurses who held my hand as I hopelessly watched my child locked into yet another seizure night after night. The same nurses who always find us a side room because Tilly can’t cope on a busy ward. Who make me toast after a long night and do whatever they can to make such a horrible experience that tiny bit more bearable. Not forgetting the doctors and support staff. 


I was furious because I watch the staff at our hospital working themselves into the ground, under staffed and over stretched but always giving us their best. I’ve never felt like anything was too much. They’ve always had time to reassure and double check. I watch them and I get so angry that they’re slated when they try so hard to make things better for us. 


So this is my little shout out to the wonderful staff at QA. Thank you for all that you do. Thank you for taking such wonderful care of my family and thank you for keeping on even in these difficult times. You make a huge difference to families like mine and you are so very appreciated. Thank you. A million times over. 

And a giant middle finger (just for good measure) to our government who have created such impossible working conditions for the amazing NHS staff. 

5 Things I Really Need To Get Over (And Maybe You Do Too?)

So, I’ve been thinking a lot lately. College is over and I have a LOT more free time. I don’t do free time. I don’t like it. I obsess over things. You might have noticed I’m having a serious bout of writers block and spend a lot of time sulking that I don’t have anything interesting to say anymore. 
Time to calm my tits. 🍉 🍉. So here are ten things I really do need to consider chilling the f out about: 

1.

Comparing my children to others. This one I’ve mastered with Tilly. She is one of a kind and dances to her own beat. Arlo is a neurotypical (fancy word for does not have special educational needs) and I’m getting a bit too obsessed about what other children his age are upto. He never does as he’s told, screams blue murder when he doesn’t get his own way and is generally a bit of a tyrannical arsehole. Why is every other kid in the cafe sat eating nicely whilst mine puts on a tragic performance worthy of the West End about sodding chicken nuggets. I’ve simply decided to accept my child is an arsehole and will just eat his nuggets for him in future, ungrateful swine. 
2.
Every now and again I go through a real slump in my self image. My current hang ups are that I don’t like any of my clothes, my hair is boring, my make up skillz are sub par and I have no clue on accessorising. I’m feeling a bit frumpy and boring and really need to stop foaming at the mouth with jealousy at all the fabulous embroidered blouses and pompoms I’m seeing all over instagram. Time to get over it. I’m built like a Viking, if I wore an embroidered blouse, instagram models would glamp under me. 

3. 
Another whingefest of mine at the moment is that everyone else seems to have their shit together whilst I’m winging it precariously through life wondering when everyone is going to cotton onto me not being a proper grown up. I know full well that the rest of you are secret giant children too… but still I grump on. All of my friends are getting married and engaged and have lovely sofas… I can’t persuade my husband to divorce me and my sofa smells of dog and wee.
4.
Bloody instagram. It started as a joke, I wanted free clothes and to take wanky flat lay photos… now I’m obsessed with instagram mum bloggers and don’t understand why my instagram following is so small. Who doesn’t love looking at pictures of my stupid dog and my brunch? I really do need to get over my instagram hump. I bleat on all the time about how stupid it is to believe the instaperfect glow… but I really need a fancy wall to pose in front of and I really need free clothes from Zara. 
5. 
This is probably the biggest one. I need to get over my FOMO fear of missing out. I sit on my smelly dog and wee soaked sofa in my pyjamas and look through my Facebook and bloody instagram and see all these lovely weddings and dinners and parties. FOMO is in full force. The most stupid part of that is that I LOVE sitting on my smelly sofa in my pjs watching Netflix. 

So there you have it, five things I really do need to build a bridge and get over. Have a word. 🍉.